Assignment: Week1 Diabetes Mellitus

Assignment: Week1 Diabetes Mellitus

Assignment: Week1 Diabetes Mellitus

Assignment: Week1 Diabetes Mellitus

ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT;Assignment: Week1 Diabetes Mellitus

Week 1 discussion Role of Research and the Importance of the Searchable Clinical Question The practice of nursing is deeply rooted in nursing knowledge, and nursing knowledge is generated and disseminated through reading, using, and creating nursing research. Professional nurses rely on research findings to inform their practice decisions; they use critical thinking to apply research directly to specific patient care situations. The research process allows nurses to ask and answer questions systematically that will ensure that decisions are based on sound science and rigorous inquiry. Nursing research helps nurses in a variety of settings answer questions about patient care, education, and administration. As you contemplate your role in the research process, read the following article. Kumar, S. (2015). Type 1 diabetes mellitus-common cases. Indian Journal of Endocrinology & Metabolism, 19, S76–S77. doi:10.4103/2230-8210.155409. http://proxy.chamberlain.edu:8080/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=102354944&site=eds-live (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Choose one case study, and formulate one searchable, clinical question in the PICO(T) format. There are several potential questions that could be asked. Identify whether the focus of your question is assessment, etiology, treatment, or prognosis. Remember to integrate references.

Diabetes mellitus is a disorder in which blood sugar (glucose) levels are abnormally high because the body does not produce enough insulin to meet its needs.

 

Urination and thirst are increased, and people may lose weight even if they are not trying to.

 

Diabetes damages the nerves and causes problems with sensation.

 

Diabetes damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and vision loss.

Doctors diagnose diabetes by measuring blood sugar levels.

People with diabetes need to follow a healthy diet that is low in refined carbohydrates (including sugar), saturated fat, and processed foods. They also need to exercise and usually take drugs to lower blood sugar levels.

Diabetes mellitus is a disorder in which the amount of sugar in the blood is elevated. Doctors often use the full name diabetes mellitus, rather than diabetes alone, to distinguish this disorder from diabetes insipidus. Diabetes insipidus is a relatively rare disorder that does not affect blood glucose levels but, just like diabetes mellitus, also causes increased urination.

Blood sugar

The three major nutrients that make up most food are carbohydrates, proteins, and fat. Sugars are one of three types of carbohydrates, along with starch and fiber.There are many types of sugar. Some sugars are simple, and others are complex. Table sugar (sucrose) is made of two simpler sugars called glucose and fructose. Milk sugar (lactose) is made of glucose and a simple sugar called galactose. The carbohydrates in starches, such as bread, pasta, rice, and similar foods, are long chains of different simple sugar molecules. Sucrose, lactose, carbohydrates, and other complex sugars must be broken down into simple sugars by enzymes in the digestive tract before the body can absorb them.

Once the body absorbs simple sugars, it usually converts them all into glucose, which is an important source of fuel for the body. Glucose is the sugar that is transported through the bloodstream and taken up by cells. The body can also make glucose from fats and proteins. Blood “sugar” really means blood glucose.

Insulin

Insulin, a hormone released from the pancreas (an organ behind the stomach that also produces digestive enzymes), controls the amount of glucose in the blood. Glucose in the bloodstream stimulates the pancreas to produce insulinInsulin helps glucose to move from the blood into the cells. Once inside the cells, glucose is converted to energy, which is used immediately, or the glucose is stored as fat or glycogen until it is needed.

How Insulin Works

The levels of glucose in the blood vary normally throughout the day. They rise after a meal and return to pre-meal levels within about 2 hours after eating. Once the levels of glucose in the blood return to pre-meal levels, insulin production decreases. The variation in blood glucose levels is usually within a narrow range, about 70 to 110 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 to 6.1 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) of blood in healthy people. If people eat a large amount of carbohydrates, the levels may increase more. People older than 65 years tend to have slightly higher levels, especially after eating.

If the body does not produce enough insulin to move the glucose into the cells, or if the cells stop responding normally to insulin (called insulin resistance), the resulting high levels of glucose in the blood and the inadequate amount of glucose in the cells together produce the symptoms and complications of diabetes.

Types of Diabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are too high to be considered normal but not high enough to be labeled diabetes. People have prediabetes if their fasting blood glucose level is between 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) and 125 mg/dL (6.9 mmol/L) or if their blood glucose level 2 hours after a glucose tolerance test is between 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) and 199 mg/dL (11.0 mmol/L). Prediabetes carries a higher risk of future diabetes as well as heart disease. Decreasing body weight by 5 to 10% through diet and exercise can significantly reduce the risk of developing future diabetes.

Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 50
Use the following coupon code :
NPS10
Order Now

The post Assignment: Week1 Diabetes Mellitus appeared first on NursingPaperSlayers.

- collegepaperslab.com